ACP 2017 Abstracts


Full Papers
Paper Nr: 1
Title:

Enabling Interactive Process Analysis with Process Mining and Visual Analytics

Authors:

P. M. Dixit, H. S. Garcia Caballero, A. Corvò, B. F. A. Hompes, J. C. A. M. Buijs and W. M. P. van der Aalst

Abstract: In a typical healthcare setting, specific clinical care pathways can be defined by the hospitals. Process mining provides a way of analyzing the care pathways by analyzing the event data extracted from the hospital information systems. Process mining can be used to optimize the overall care pathway, and gain interesting insights into the actual execution of the process, as well as to compare the expectations versus the reality. In this paper, a generic novel tool called InterPretA, is introduced which builds upon pre-existing process mining and visual analytics techniques to enable the user to perform such process oriented analysis. InterPretA contains a set of options to provide high level conformance analysis of a process from different perspectives. Furthermore, InterPretA enables detailed investigative analysis by letting the user interactively analyze, visualize and explore the execution of the processes from the data perspective.

Paper Nr: 2
Title:

Towards Process Mining of EMR Data - Case Study for Sepsis Management

Authors:

Gert-Jan de Vries, Ricardo Alfredo Quintano Neira, Gijs Geleijnse, Prabhakar Dixit and Bruno Franco Mazza

Abstract: Imagine you have cold shivers and a racing heartbeat and high fever. Clear thinking is impossible! Ceiling lights flash by as you are rushed to the emergency department (ED). You feel your body is getting even sicker. Doctors are doing their utmost to treat this acute and threatening condition, while they work piece together all small parts of evidence to set the diagnosis and start targeted treatment. In this situation, the clinical staff depends on a clinical pathway protocol to streamline communication and deliver care according to the latest medical evidence. Today, such clinical pathways are mainly executed and tracked using paper. Hence, there is ample opportunity for technology in a supportive role. Automated process analysis can help improve these processes of delivering standardized care beyond their current level. In this paper, we provide insight into the steps required to perform process mining to EMR data in the challenging domain of sepsis treatment and provide learnings from our preliminary analysis of these data using process mining techniques.

Paper Nr: 3
Title:

Translating a Clinical Workflow into a Computer-executable Model - User Needs Discovery, Challenges and Lessons Learned

Authors:

Ana Leitão, Jennifer Caffarel and Erin Stretton

Abstract: Getting to technical requirements from user input is already a hard task in an environment where the workflow processes are very well defined. When trying to extract a unique process from the users of such a variable work environment such as a healthcare institution can be very challenging. In this paper, we share our experience with extracting user requirements from clinical users by presenting the specific example of transforming workflows into models that can then be used as part of an IT solution to support workflow guidance. Here we present not only some of our main challenges when approaching different institutions and professionals with different roles, but also some of the methods we find most useful to establish communication and extract as much relevant information possible. In the end we explain some of the differences between a workflow as explained by the users and a computer–executable model and how to make the connection between the two.

Paper Nr: 4
Title:

Process Improvement in an Oncology Day Hospital: Design of a Traceability and Indicator System

Authors:

Eduardo Cañada, Enrique Casado and Ana M. Bernardos

Abstract: Day hospitals (DH) are organizational structures that enable the supervision of patients who must go through diagnosis methods or treatments taking several hours, but not requiring inpatient hospitalization. Oncology Day Hospitals (ODH) are a particularly complex subset of DH, due to the variety and type of pathologies that are treated in them, the characteristics of cytostatic drugs, the involvement of different hospital units and professional profiles, the number of stages of the care procedure and the cost. In this paper, we describe the design of a traceability and indicator system for ODH, which aims at improving the performance and quality of service, providing three-folded benefits for patients, practitioners and hospital managers. The system is currently being tested in a public hospital in the Autonomous Community of Madrid. Their users perceive that they have access to a much more accurate fingerprint of everyday workflow, thus facilitating the design of improvement actions.

Short Papers
Paper Nr: 6
Title:

ICT: Health’s Best Friend and Worst Enemy?

Authors:

Egon L. van den Broek

Abstract: I propose a paradigm shift for health care, as there is an urgent need for i) continuous (semi-)automatic medical checkups, ii) cost reduction, and iii) cure for the 21st century black plague (i.e., stress-related diseases) are very much needed. To realize this ICT’s Paradox has to be solved. On the one hand, ICT can cause i) musculoskeletal problems, ii) vision problems, iii) headache, iv) obesity, v) stress disorders (e.g., burn out), vi) metabolic issues, vii) addiction (e.g., to games, social media, and Internet), viii) sleeping problems, ix) social isolation, and x) an unrealistic world view. On the other hand, ICT claims to provide these problems’ solutions. Consequently, health informatics needs to adopt a holistic approach, improve its fragile theoretical frameworks, and handle the incredible variance we all show. As a remedy, I propose to take up the challenge to next-generation models of personality, as they are a crucial determinant in people’s stress coping style.